Edward Hudson Schofield

Edward Hudson Schofield
Edward Hudson Schofield

Although probably never an exhibitor at Wakefield, E H Schofield judged the Annual show on a number of occasions, notably in 1875 and 1878, on the latter occasion judging with John Hepworth. We are indebted to his Great-Great-Grandson Peter Schofield now resident in San Antonio, Texas, USA who contacted the Society in 2016 and has given us permission to use photographs of his ancestor with a link to the Schofield Family Tree. Click on the picture to expand it.

Edward was a great exhibitor for around 50 years. The earliest show located was in 1848, where at the United Florists of Leeds tulip show he won the class for a feathered bizarre with ‘Charles X’ a synonym for ‘Royal Sovereign’ which still wins prizes over 150 years later. In his later years during the 1880s he was a regular exhibitor at the Royal National Tulip Society shows held in the Botanical Gardens in Manchester.

In addition to his showing prowess Edward also bred Florists’ Tulips, though unfortunately none have survived into the 21st Century. His best known raising is ‘George Edward’ which is described in Sir Daniel Hall’s The Tulip on pages 168/9. This was a flamed bybloemen. He had a flower named after him ‘Edward Schofield’, again no longer available, a rose feather, for which the raiser has not yet been identified.

As recorded in Anna Pavord’s The Tulip on page 257 Schofield was recognised as one of the leading tulip fanciers of his time when the Society in 1928 made a plea on behalf of the Florists’ tulip. ‘Help us keep the names of Sharpley, Mellor, Moorhouse, Schofield, Hepworth, Gill, Hardwick and many other tulip raisers of old to the fore. 

Like many other old florists Edward did not grow and show only tulips but was also very successful with Carnations and Pinks.

It will come as no surprise to readers of this site to learn that his occupation was as a Cordwainer

Further information regarding his tulip interest may be found on the Schofield Family Tree

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.